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z:ghlh-paper [2014/11/29 20:25]
njovanovic
z:ghlh-paper [2014/11/29 20:26] (current)
njovanovic
Line 9: Line 9:
 How best to exploit opportunities provided at the crossroads of these trends, achievements, and demands? How to approach translations from a philological standpoint? How best to exploit opportunities provided at the crossroads of these trends, achievements, and demands? How to approach translations from a philological standpoint?
  
-We will present results of research done on a 1000-sentence corpus of Greek and Latin aligned with Croatian. This corpus, called GHLH (for "grčko-hrvatski / latinsko-hrvatski", Greek-Croatian / Latin-Croatian), is being realised as XML database, with relationships between source and target language encoded following the Alpheios scheme for aligned text. The encoding is done by university students (of Latin and Greek, native Croatian speakers). the collection, freely available under a Creative Commons license, is accessible as a BaseX database, with a set of XQueries designed to stimulate research and interpretation of relationships between originals and translations.+We will present results of research done on a 1000-sentence corpus of Greek and Latin aligned with Croatian. This corpus, called GHLH (for "grčko-hrvatski / latinsko-hrvatski", Greek-Croatian / Latin-Croatian), is being realised as XML database, with relationships between source and target language encoded following the Alpheios scheme for aligned text. The encoding is done by university students (of Latin and Greek, native Croatian speakers). the collection, freely available under a Creative Commons license, will be accessible as a BaseX database, with a set of XQueries designed to stimulate research and interpretation of relationships between originals and translations.
 Texts and translations included in the GHLH corpus are special in two ways. First, our corpus is not limited to ancient text: we are including also samples of Latin texts written by Croatian authors, from the Middle Ages to the modernity. Second, the translations we have chosen are not only close and "literal", i. e. striving for a 1:1 correspondence between source and target. We want to explore ways and procedures necessary for encoding relationship between a text and translation which is free, "culturally equivalent", close to paraphrase. Our working hypotheses are that different target languages require different aligning practices (Croatian requires a different approach to aligning than English), and that different "levels of translation" again require different aligning practices. Our work intends to stimulate discussion about these levels. Texts and translations included in the GHLH corpus are special in two ways. First, our corpus is not limited to ancient text: we are including also samples of Latin texts written by Croatian authors, from the Middle Ages to the modernity. Second, the translations we have chosen are not only close and "literal", i. e. striving for a 1:1 correspondence between source and target. We want to explore ways and procedures necessary for encoding relationship between a text and translation which is free, "culturally equivalent", close to paraphrase. Our working hypotheses are that different target languages require different aligning practices (Croatian requires a different approach to aligning than English), and that different "levels of translation" again require different aligning practices. Our work intends to stimulate discussion about these levels.
  
z/ghlh-paper.txt · Last modified: 2014/11/29 20:26 by njovanovic
 
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